The unconference will revolve around a variety of discussion topics which will take place throughout the duration of AScUS. Some of these discussion sessions have initial homework / exploratory exercises that are part of the pre-conference program. Click on the name of a discussion topic to learn more about its goal, format, and content. Click here to view our full schedule.

All times are Central European Summer Time (CEST) - see our schedule for conversion tables

  1. Joint opening session
    Wednesday 03 Jun 2020 · 14:00-15-00
  2. Keynote by Jessica Seddon
    Wednesday 03 Jun 2020 · 15:00-16-00
  3. Virtual opening reception
    Wednesday 03 Jun 2020 · 16:00-17-00
  4. Keynote by Paul Zimmerman
    Thursday 04 Jun 2020 · 11:00-12-00
  5. Smart Cities, Urban Infrastructure Transitions, and Sustainability
    Thursday 04 Jun 2020 · 12:00-14-30
  6. Participatory Governance Towards Urban Sustainability – Challenges and Opportunities in Different Regulatory Settings
    Thursday 04 Jun 2020 · 12:00-14-30
  7. Adapted urban waste infrastructure as a driver for distributed circular economies
    Thursday 04 Jun 2020 · 15:30-18-00
  8. Spatialising the urban metabolism
    Thursday 04 Jun 2020 · 15:30-18-00
  9. Virtual Happy Hour
    Thursday 04 Jun 2020 · 18:00-19-00
  10. Reaching Youth and the Community: Collecting Ideas for Public Outreach as a Path to Action
    Friday 05 Jun 2020 · 12:00-14-30
  11. Challenges and opportunities around open data - charting an actionable path
    Friday 05 Jun 2020 · 12:00-14-30
  12. Envisioning urban futures: the untraceable city
    Friday 05 Jun 2020 · 15:30-18-00
  13. Integrations of Justice in Transdisciplinary Research: Towards New Sustainable Paradigms and Meaningful Advocacy
    Friday 05 Jun 2020 · 15:30-18-00
  14. Joint closing session
    Friday 05 Jun 2020 · 18:30-19-00
  15. Virtual Happy Hour
    Friday 05 Jun 2020 · 19:00-20-00
Joint opening session

Wednesday 03 Jun · 2020 14:00-15:00 CEST

During the joint opening session we will go through the unconference program, discuss the goals and practical matters, and officially open the event!

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Keynote by Jessica Seddon

Wednesday 03 Jun · 2020 15:00-16:00 CEST

Second Order Smart: Science and City Transformation

Translating science into action can be challenging – knowing the contours of a problem, or the path to a solution is several steps away from an individual, let alone a broader social response to that knowledge. How can we reduce this lag between learning and doing? This is more than an academic question – it is an everyday practical challenge for cities working to deliver infrastructure, services, and sense of community to their residents in a fast changing social and environmental context. This talk will propose a new concept of city intelligence, focusing on how science shapes social systems, including both actor knowledge and preferences but more importantly alter the range of relationships and institutional designs that are possible. It draws on insights from economics, sociology, and behavioural science to motivate a broad taxonomy of ways that science can create systemic impact, and illustrates these possibilities with examples from my and others’ experience in city and subnational change.

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Virtual opening reception

Wednesday 03 Jun · 2020 16:00-17:00 CEST

During the opening reception, all participants can get to know each other.

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Keynote by Paul Zimmerman

Thursday 04 Jun · 2020 11:00-12:00 CEST

Paul Zimmerman is CEO of Designing Hong Kong, an elected District Councillor representing the Pokfulam constituency, and a board member of Civic Exchange, Professional Commons, Hong Kong Democratic Foundation, and the Patient Care Foundation. His Hong Kong Government advisory functions include the Harbourfront Commission. Paul has a Masters in Social Science (Economics) from the Erasmus University in Rotterdam, and a Masters of Arts (Transport Policy and Planning) from The University of Hong Kong. He arrived in Hong Kong in 1984 and became a Chinese citizen in 2012.

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Smart Cities, Urban Infrastructure Transitions, and Sustainability

Thursday 04 Jun · 2020 12:00-14:30 CEST

Moderators: Jessica Clement, and Kangkang Tong Cities play a critical role in achieving sustainability due to the planetary scale impact of urban activities and ongoing rapid urbanization. New urban initiatives are proposed with the integration of emerging technologies, such as smart cities and sustainable infrastructure planning. However, we should further explore whether and how these new initiatives can contribute to sustainability. This session has an overarching theme on the relationship of the emerging urban initiatives and sustainability, and it includes two parts.

Part 1, moderated by Jessica Clement, reflects on whether smart cities can contribute to sustainable development. Evidence suggests smart cities can support sustainability, but smart cities also face criticism that their agenda does not pay enough attention to equity, social justice, and environmental concerns. In part 1, we will discuss different viewpoints of smart cities and aim to understand what (if anything) needs to change for transitions to smart and sustainable cities.

The format of Part 1 takes place through discussion questions. The questions are: 1) What are the different definitions or concepts of the smart city? 2) What are the potential benefits of developing smart cities? What are the potential downsides? a. How may these pros or cons be different across contexts, and namely in developing versus developed cities? b. Considering the downsides discussed, what implementations can be considered to mitigate any negative effects of smart cities? 3) Can smart cities be (part of) a solution to sustainability? The outcomes of this part include a list of research questions to advance this subject. If relevant, the outcomes may also include a short list of priority policy objectives on developing smart and sustainable cities.

Part 2, moderated by Kangkang Tong, discusses how urban infrastructure transitions can achieve sustainability. When cities are making efforts to plan for sustainable, current urban infrastructure systems, such as energy systems, transportation, waste management, etc., are locked in the high material and energy intensity pathways. Thus, it is urgent to plan and design infrastructure systems to enable sustainable urban development. While cities are making efforts, the enablers and barriers for such transitions are still not clear. In part 2, we will discuss what is needed and from which level to enable a sustainable urban infrastructure transition.

The format of Part 2 is semi-structured discussions. Three questions are: 1) How we define transitions in the context of urban infrastructure systems and how our research is related to urban transitions? 2) What enables and barriers we have known for urban infrastructure transitions? 3) What is needed in future research, practices, and science-to-actions to enable urban infrastructure transitions? The outcome of this part is an outline of a white paper.

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Participatory Governance Towards Urban Sustainability – Challenges and Opportunities in Different Regulatory Settings

Thursday 04 Jun · 2020 12:00-14:30 CEST

Organizers: Jun.-Prof. Dr. Cathrin Zengerling (Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg) PhD. cand. Nikita John (Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg) PhD. cand. Lisa Harseim (Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg) PhD. cand. Malaz Seif Al-Isalm (Khartoum University, Sudan)

Abstract: International legal and political mandates increasingly emphasize and embrace the role of local governments in achieving global sustainability goals. Two recent examples are the Sustainable Development Goals which for the first time explicitly addressed the city-level in its SDG 11 (inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable cities and human settlements) and the Paris Agreement which includes non-state actors in its NAZCA (non-state actor zone for climate action) platform. In addition, cities themselves increasingly engage in international city-networks such as C40, the Global Covenant of Mayors for Climate and Energy or ICLEI to cooperate, exchange knowledge and join forces towards sustainable urban development.

However, when researchers grapple with the question how cities can be strengthened in their efforts towards urban sustainability, they are confronted with highly varying local governance systems. In our session, we want to present, discuss, and try to cluster local governance systems in different regulatory settings. For example, the legal scope of action of cities varies greatly in unitary and federal states. Cities also have highly different local budgets, among others dependent on their power to raise and spend taxes. Another crucial difference is the degree of legal pluralism present in a specific place. Furthermore, postcolonial power structures often significantly influence the local governance system.

We want to explore these different regulatory settings and their influence on urban sustainability governance. The focus will lie on the design and implementation of strategic urban sustainability plans, such as – for example – urban development and climate action plans with a special emphasis on participation. Our initial case studies will encompass cities as diverse as Hamburg, New Delhi and Khartoum.

Goal of Session: Raising awareness for and creating an understanding of how to utilize the highly different regulatory preconditions of local sustainability governance; creating clusters of local governance systems according to their different regulatory settings; collecting and discussing challenges and opportunities of local sustainability governance in the different governance systems; explore the role of participation in making design and implementation of local strategic sustainability plans more effective.

Structure: The discussion session will be started with a short presentation to lay the foundation for common understanding and enable consistency in the following debate. We will explore the case studies of Hamburg, New Delhi and Khartoum as well as examples brought in by the participants of the (pre-)session. The hosts will give brief inputs for each case study and guide discussions on the respective urban governance opportunities and challenges.

Estimated Deliverable: The session aims to create clusters of local governance systems and identify cluster-specific challenges and opportunities for urban sustainability governance. The outcomes highlight anchor points to be considered in further governance research and contextualized environmental policy making. The mid-term goal is to provide tailored information on how efforts towards urban sustainability can be strengthened in different regulatory settings to relevant actors and decision-makers such as local governments, concerned NGOs and city networks.

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Adapted urban waste infrastructure as a driver for distributed circular economies

Thursday 04 Jun · 2020 15:30-18:00 CEST

General statement of the discussion session:

The European waste management infrastructure is in need of an overhaul, either due to new regulations, such as separate biowaste collection and increased quotas for recyclables or due to ageing infrastructure, such as sewers. At the same time, advances in bio-, mechanical- and chemical processing promise a way of converting diverse waste streams into higher-value material of societal importance, such as recycled plastics and composites, biobased materials (e.g. packaging, adhesives) and other circular materials. This sustainability of the circular economy concept is affected by the geography of resource loops: there is growing evidence that localised solutions can be advantageous, calling for interactions between local feedstock generators (e.g. waste management companies) and local product manufacturer (e.g. chemical or mechanical processing facilities). Hence, municipalities and waste companies are faced with the need to collect and convert waste streams in a way that provides adequate feedstock for further processing. Moving away from hypothetical scenarios to municipal reality with tight budgets and limited capacities for risk-taking, the question is which infrastructure investments or changes to favour in which local context.

Specific goal This session has three aims: i) explore how waste infrastructure can be a driver for such distributed circular economies (considering currently existing technologies), ii) determine in which local contexts they are particularly sensible (e.g. type of local industry) and iii) identify a catalogue of questions that can guide infrastructure investments decisions.

Estimated deliverable The deliverable will be an opinion piece in a relevant outlet, including the catalogue of questions aimed at urban decision makers, e.g. planning or waste authorities. Hence, this session is aimed at translating knowledge from academia into industry and the public sector, rather than serving a purely academic purpose.

Format The format would be a mix of smaller group discussions (~20 min), deliberating one of the three aims, combined with structured sharing (~10 min) and discussion (~10 min) in the larger group with subsequent consent-based decision making (~5 min) on proposals for the opinion peace. Thus, the session would run just under 2.5 hours with a short intro and three 45 minutes sub-sessions.

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Spatialising the urban metabolism

Thursday 04 Jun · 2020 15:30-18:00 CEST

The topic of “spatialising the urban metabolism” has met with growing interest among researchers and has grown significantly in recent years. According to Scopus, we have identified 438 published articles, the majority from 2010s. The scientific landscapes are varied and among 20 communities according to a bibiometric analysis (that we will present during the session).

This topic can be understood as the idea of opening the “black box” of urban material and energy functioning, but also of considering that the spatial dimension should not be treated as "absolute" and homogeneous, when it can be very politically charged and refers to numerous socioeconomic and territorial processes.

The goal of the discussion session could entail, what can we learn from spatialising metabolic analysis / spatialising flows and actors / linking urban metabolism and spatial planning / territorial ecology / different sub-metabolisms for the same city / relationship between cities and their hinterland / political-industrial ecology / linking metabolic flows and ecosystem services, etc.

The discussion will take place in three phases: *Phase 1 (1h): 3 introductory presentations + Q&A and 3 introductory presentations + Q&A See below the presentation of speakers : Sabine Barles (professor of urban planning in Paris), Daniella Perroti (Professor Landscape Architecture at UCLouvain), Stephan Kampelmann (Chair of Circular Economy and Urban Metabolism, Université Libre de Bruxelles), Paul Hoekman (Co-founder of Metabolism of Cities) and the two session organizers will constitute this first panel of participants.

15 min break

Phase 2 (30 min): We will also briefly summarize these introductory points, which will be a transition to the questions addressed during the second step. This second stage will consist of open discussion during the second hour with the participants using a map of predefined questions in order to frame the debates.

Separation into 3 groups (with Aris, Paul and JB as moderator) with suggestions for presentations to be discussed on what can be activated on this facet of MU-S. And discuss the table to fill: What we can do, what we can not do, and what would be original / not standard /eccentric with the spatialization of UM. We will fill this table during the session. This will be done by using https://www.mindmeister.com/

Phase 3 (30 min): The last step regarding the subject of "path to action" and what we want to do as deliverables from this workshop. Among the possibilities, a special issue proposal, a review paper or a “Not-to-do” list for public policy makers will be discussed, as well as discuss what data are needed to spatialize the metabolism of a city.

Discuss this table, ask participants what they think of the mindmaps. We will gather the mindmaps and store. Ideally, after the conference we would like to build upon (synthesise, write a paper, ...) for something more substantial

Session organizers: Jean-Baptiste Bahers and Aristide Athanassiadis

Contribution Jean-Baptiste Bahers (short summary): The presentation will show a bibliometric analysis according from Scopus database. We have identified 483 published articles, the majority from 2010s. The scientific landscapes are varied and among 20 communities. We will show a map of co-citation of cited authors based on bibliographic data and co-occurrence map based of notions from titles, abstracts and key words. Finally, we will discuss the terms of “spatial”, ie the notions, concepts, theories and methods which emerge from it.

Contribution Sabine Barles The talk with focus on the urban metabolism, territorial ecology, and technical and environmental history.

Contribution Ursula Cardenas Mamani and Daniela Perrotti The presentation provides a short introduction to Ecosystem Services (ES) as potential critical factors in the mitigation of the material and energy demand in cities. Looking into the effects that ES have on the metabolism of cities (through Drivers, Pressures and State indicators) can provide novel alternatives for the mitigation of resource use as well as contribute to an understanding of flows and stocks dynamics within urban systems.

Contribution Stephan Kampelmann "The talk with focus on the urban metabolism of wood, tracing the different steps along the value chain from trees to urban woodworking. Due to the focus on global value chains based on fast-growing plantation forests, city trees have long been ignored as local supply of material for carpentry and construction. This has changed in recent years due to the convergence of local woodworking initiatives and the increase of preemptive cuts of city trees due to insect-related diseases and the toll of climate adaptation."

Contribution Paul Hoekman (short summary): Presentation of the Metabolism of Cities Data Hub and how this is used to record and visualize material stock and flows data on a finegrained level. Introduction of how territorial subdivision works in the latest version of our system, and how choropleth maps can be generated to gain quick visual insights into differences within areas. Also a look at logging data on individual infrastructure/site level (e.g. individual wastewater treatment plant or food market), and how to use this to "unpack" the black box.

Contribution Aristide Athanassiadis (short summary): The presentation will show what are the additional insights mapping and spatialising the metabolism of cities provide for researchers and policy makers. Indeed the spatialisation can not only show which parts of cities are responsible for resource use, what are the drivers of resource use. This presentation will also show, how depending on the way resource use is measured, other drivers can become apparent. Finally, a comparison between cities will reflect on how context-specific metabolic drivers are.

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Virtual Happy Hour

Thursday 04 Jun · 2020 18:00-19:00 CEST

The happy hours provide an unstructured place for catching up and getting to know each other. You can choose one of three virtual bars which are named after real places in Segovia: El Saxo, La Concepción, and El Tartare. Typically, the host of your discussion session will name one of the bars at the end of the session as a place to continue the conversation.

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Reaching Youth and the Community: Collecting Ideas for Public Outreach as a Path to Action

Friday 05 Jun · 2020 12:00-14:30 CEST

With 90% of all future population growth happening in cities, achievement of the UN SDGs will have to be addressed within the context of global urbanization. Behavior change and education are vital levers in progressing towards the future sustainable cities we want to see. In preparing for this challenge, the need for new communication methods, teaching paradigms and thought models has been identified by multiple experts across the world. What is the best way to unlock the potential of transformative ideas in areas like urban metabolism, circular economy, and sustainability science for the community at large? If we could design a community outreach program or a course for middle or high-school level, what would that look like?

The goal of this Discussion is to create a list of interdisciplinary resources, actions and activities appropriate for a general global audience. Leveraging the diverse expertise and geographic locations of conference attendees, this Discussion will seek to highlight the connections between single-subjects as well to shape a view towards future careers or civic action in Urban Sustainability fields.

During the pre-conference virtual activities, the community will be invited to share ideas and resources regarding their experiences and priorities. This information will be collected, organized by theme and shared with all prior to the Discussion event.

The Discussion event will be structured around refining the crowd-sourced information with the Path to Action being recommenced program content for a community outreach program about Urban Sustainability Science. Key topic areas include Science, Environmental Education, STEAM Education, Social Studies, Engineering, Civics.

We can pledge in this UN-SDG Decade of Action to make Urban Sustainability communication a priority by sharing this Path to Action with UN Habitat and other global organizations in an effort to begin a reciprocal dialogue on implementation possibilities.

Session Organizer: Maureen Ferry, Architect ETH-Z, Global Teach SDG Ambassador and founder, HouseStories, an organization dedicated to engaging youth globally with their built environment through interdisciplinary, systems-based outreach programs.

view AScUS submission "The Transformative Potential of K12 Systems-Based Urban Resiliency Curriculum" here: https://vimeo.com/418856585

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Challenges and opportunities around open data - charting an actionable path

Friday 05 Jun · 2020 12:00-14:30 CEST

Access to data is becoming increasingly relevant, with the open provision of scientific output and the underlying data expected to significantly boost research efficiency. The session will tackle the question of how to (better) provide, access and integrate open data within the IE society.

The session is structured into three blocks:

  1. Existing infrastructure, experiences and expectations. This block aims at exchanging experiences and expectations of the participants regarding access to data (data from previous scientific publications, data portals / repositories and any other source) its re-use and ways of providing it. The specific requirements from the different IE disciplines and obstacles for providing data shall also be addressed.

  2. Putting open data into practice Within this block, the “Metabolism of Cities” Data Hub is presented as a case study/example of an existing open data infrastructure within the IE society. This data hub aims to centralise, visualise, and present datasets related to urban material stocks and flows, as well as data on other urban features. Within the session the current features of this platform are revised and discussed regarding the direction that the participants would like to see this work go.

  3. Engaging stakeholders towards actionable science The session gathers and develops ideas around building a data collection and uploading community around Metabolism of Cities and sharing of experiences with those who might have organized one. Issues of how to engage stakeholders, how to motivate the provision and re-use of open data will be worked out and charted in a mental map.

Organisers Jens Peters, Anne Ventura, Paul Hoekman, Kimenthrie Finlay and Carolin Bellstedt

Pre-conference activities:

Prior to the session, a document with preparatory questions will be sent around allowing to create a common understanding. Participation in the pre-conference activities is highly recommended, where the outline and scope of the discussions is explained more in detail. Please note meetings related to this session:

Meet-up (May 25th - 3-4pm CEST): presentation of session, main concepts and issues, ice-breaking activity. Technical support session (June 1st - 3-4pm CEST): an optional follow-up activity.

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Envisioning urban futures: the untraceable city

Friday 05 Jun · 2020 15:30-18:00 CEST

If you could build a city from scratch, what would you do? What services would you provide and how would you provide them? The only catch is that your city follows the should be triple 95 rule: products and infrastructure must either be 95% compostable OR be durable for 95 years, and they must contribute to restoring impacted ecosystems to 95% of their original capacity..… and carbon neutral.

The goal of the first part of our discussion session is to delve deep into the future we really want and need as humans, and then revisit cities that exist and look at them with fresh eyes. The future needs new cities, new sections of cities as well as sustainably retrofitted old cities.

In the second part we will look at the opportunities and barriers for achieving carbon neutrality in new and existing cities. We generate a discussion ... What can your discipline add to the discussion? Let us come together and see how all the different systems of our radically sustainable future city can be negotiated and made manifest.

Moderated by Lynette Cheah, Frances Taylor, Sybil Derrible, Matan Mayer, and Paul Hoekman

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Integrations of Justice in Transdisciplinary Research: Towards New Sustainable Paradigms and Meaningful Advocacy

Friday 05 Jun · 2020 15:30-18:00 CEST

Organizers:

Santiago Perez, Doctorant-Chercheur, Université de Technologie de Troyes, santiago.perez@utt.fr

Mercedes C. Quesada-Embid, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Environmental Policy and Advocacy Catawba College, N.C., USA, mquesada19@catawba.edu

Abstract:

This session will provide an opportunity for an in-depth and perceptive discussion surrounding transdisciplinary research and its significance to the concept of justice. Connected to this is an exploratory dialogue on how sustainability aligns with transdisciplinarity and how distinct fields of study have the capacity to be strongly connected to advocacy work for positive social change. The session will emphasize the importance of systems thinking and the layered realities found within the scales and spheres of the cultural, political, economic and ecological elements inherent to the environmental justice movement. Non-conventional research approaches, although often considered peripheral to the mainstream, shed light on global exemplars that reach far beyond technicalities in order to augment multi-cultural and multi-generational research accessibility. Such examples will be collectively discussed, and their advantages examined, in order to understand how one can retain credibilities, surpass disenfranchisements, and effectively link authentic justice across urban and rural geographic, climatic, and socio-political boundaries.

Indeed, this dialogue will underscore the necessity of retaining a relevant intergenerational and interspecies grounding as distinctive themes and topics emerge throughout the discussion, in an effort to model the significance of inclusivity and empowerment to transdisciplinary and sustainability approaches.

Objective and Goals of the Session:

  1. Discuss the intersections of justice across varied ecological, social, cultural and economic landscapes
  2. Share Insights on the breadth of transdisciplinary research and its applications towards the co-creation of more just research futures
  3. Highlight practical, non-conventional forms of research engagement for new sustainable paradigms
  4. Offer communicative methods for strengthening advocacy work, focusing on engagement from the individual to the collective, including in the uncertain times of social distancing
  5. Provide useful tools and empowering strategies for leadership within environmental justice
  6. Discuss privilege and its role in promoting and impeding a transition toward sustainable communities
  7. Showcase transitions processes towards more just realities around the globe
  8. Emphasize the inherent connections of sustainability work to diversity, equity and inclusion

Structure of the session

This session is approximately 2 hours in length. It will begin with brief introductions of the organizers and the participants: professional backgrounds, places of origin, community work, and overarching session expectations. The introductory conversation will be followed by a dialogue related to a set of guiding questions that aim to instill a sense of commonality across the varied considerations that justice, transdisciplinarity and sustainability engender. These initial questions will be offered to the participants in advance for thoughtful preparation of the session:

  1. What conceptual frameworks come to mind when you hear the terms interdisciplinary, cross-disciplinary, multidisciplinary, and transdisciplinary?
  2. If you were tasked with creating the dictionary definition for sustainability, what would you say is your best definition?
  3. Consider an example of a case-study or project related to sustainability that you believe is effective, and bring a few sentences about it with you the session to share with others in the discussion
  4. Please create at least 1 discussion question to bring with you to the session, related to the themes of justice and sustainability

It is our aim that the dialogue will continue to fluidly evolve and be shaped by the diverse experiences and perspectives of the group. The session will draw upon the contributions of the participants and will wholeheartedly encourage an integrated collaboration throughout.

Deliverables and Session Outcomes

The anticipated outcomes of this session are for participants to leave the session with:

  1. Tools that ensure inclusive research approaches for reciprocal community involvement
  2. Communicative strategies for meaningful advocacy throughout the stages of research, so as to help ensure the success and longevity of research impacts
  3. Creation of a global network of researchers and practitioners participating in building just realities

Lastly, we present a podcast opportunity for continued engagement fostering creative outlets for participants to stay connected and put into practice take-aways from the session. We would like to see a cultivation of participation that could develop into a series of podcast episodes showcasing different social and natural scientific methodologies that support a transdisciplinary, justice-oriented model.


This full discussion session will follow a preliminary, preparatory session on June 2, 2020 from 14:00-15:00. The details of which are:

Pre-Session Title: Preliminary Conversation on Integrations of Justice in Transdisciplinary Research

Brief Description: This pre-session aims to generate excitement and intrigue for our forthcoming opportunity to discuss collective, insightful interpretations of transdisciplinarity and its research applications. During this pre-session, we will focus on identifying and priming the conceptual frameworks most closely associated to our understandings of justice, our personal passions and professional priorities surrounding sustainability challenges, and the interdependent and interconnected nature of socio-ecological systems. We hope this pre-session dialogue serves to create an interwoven blend of experiences and perspectives that we will be able to build upon in our upcoming discussion which will emphasize myriad strategies for paradigmatic change.

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Joint closing session

Friday 05 Jun · 2020 18:30-19:00 CEST

During the closing session we will wrap up the event, go over the highlights, and hold our awards ceremony.

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Virtual Happy Hour

Friday 05 Jun · 2020 19:00-20:00 CEST

The happy hours provide an unstructured place for catching up and getting to know each other. You can choose one of three virtual bars which are named after real places in Segovia: El Saxo, La Concepción, and El Tartare. Typically, the host of your discussion session will name one of the bars at the end of the session as a place to continue the conversation.

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